Transplant Surgery »  Education & Training »  Clinical Fellows »  James M. Gardner, M.D., Ph.D.
James M. Gardner, M.D., Ph.D.

James M. Gardner, M.D., Ph.D.

Abdominal Transplant Fellow (PGY-6)
Division of Transplant Surgery

Contact Information

Open Popup
  • Harvard University, B.A., Biochemical Sciences, 2002
  • University of California San Francisco, M.D., Ph.D. 2012
  • University of California San Francisco, Intern, General Surgery. 2012-2013
  • University of California San Francisco, Resident, General Surgery. 2013-2016
  • University of California San Francisco, Chief Resident, General Surgery, 2016-2017
  • UCSF Department of Surgery
  • UCSF Division of Transplant Surgery
  • UCSF Diabetes Center
  • Transplant Surgery
  • General Surgery
  • Immune tolerance
  • Autoimmmune diabetes
  • Transplant surgery
James M. Gardner, M.D., Ph.D. is a General Surgery chief resident in the Department of Surgery and a research fellow in the UCSF Diabetes Center. Dr. Gardner obtained a B.A. from Harvard University in Biochemical Sciences and his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from UCSF. He is continuing his training as the 2017 fellow in Abdominal Transplant Surgery at UCSF.
Dr. Gardner's research is focused on the mechanisms regulating self-tolerance in the adaptive immune system, and translating these findings into relevant therapeutics for inducing and maintaining donor-specific tolerance. In mentored collaboration with the Mark Anderson lab at the UCSF Diabetes Center, Dr. Gardner's studies focus on a gene called the Autoimmune Regulator, or Aire, which is a key regulator of central tolerance. Dr. Gardner and Dr. Anderson have defined a novel population of extrathymic Aire-expressing cells (eTACs), and their work focuses on the role of this population in autoimmunity and tolerance.
  • American Society of Transplant Surgeons Fellowship in Transplantation Grant 2017
  • NIH/NIHAI R01 - Developing eTACs as a Novel Method of Tolerance in Type 1 Diabetes
  • American Diabetes Association Young Investigator Award
  1. Gardner et al., American Transplant Congress, 2015. Outcomes in a new category of Pancreas-After-Islet Transplantation.
  2. Gardner et al., UCSF Surgery Resident Research Symposium, 2013-2016. Extrathymic Aire-Expressing Cells in Immune Tolerance and Transplantation.
  3. Gardner et al., International Pancreas and Islet Transplant Association 2013. Outcomes in a new category of Pancreas-After-Islet Transplantation.
  4. Gardner et al., Children?s Diabetes Foundation of the North Bay Annual Retreat, 2010. Novel Approaches for Preventing and Treating Juvenile Diabetes: What?s on the Horizon?
  5. Gardner et al., Kyoto T Cell Conference 2009. Extrathymic Aire-Expressing Cells and the Maintenance of Immunologic Tolerance.
  6. Gardner et al., American Diabetes Association Tour de Cure Donors? Evening, 2008. New approaches to Preventing and Treating Autoimmune Diabetes.
  7. Gardner et al., UCSF/UCB 2008 Immunology Retreat. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Extrathymic Aire-Expressing Cells.
  1. Gardner JM, Anderson MS. The Mouse Model of Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome Type I. Immunoendocrinology: Scientific and Clinical Aspects. 1st edition. Ed. Eisenbarth G. (New York: Humana Press, 2011.)

X